Easter doesn’t have to be all about kids


It’s almost Easter. You know what that means. People with children are going a little crazy filling baskets with candy and toys, buying cute little Easter outfits, dyeing hard-boiled eggs, and organizing Easter egg hunts. They might be attending events in which somebody shows up dressed in a bunny costume. If the kids are in school this week, they’ll be making things like Easter cards and papier-mâché eggs. If they’re out of school on spring break, they’ll be throwing their parents’ schedules into a tizzy, making it difficult to work or do their usual activities.

All of this is a big deal to those who have children, and a lot of it is fun. When I was kid, I would wake up on Easter morning to find big baskets of goodies on my dresser. I believed the Easter bunny had brought them, although of course they really came from my mother and grandmother. We got dressed up and went to church, but for us kids, Easter was about candy and presents. I guess it still is.
That might make people without children feel a little left out, but hey, Easter is not really about bunnies and baskets of goodies. It’s about the resurrection of Christ from the dead. And you know what? Jesus didn’t have any kids. It’s fascinating to think what might have happened if he did, but he didn’t. He devoted his life on earth to his ministry.
Not everyone reading this is Christian. Maybe you’re just celebrating the arrival of spring. We can all believe whatever we choose to believe. I not only believe the Jesus story, I work as a music minister for a Catholic church and will be immersed in church music for the next five days. In our nightly services, we will take the story from the Last Supper to the crucifixion and on to the resurrection. My only connection with children will be watching a couple of the kids I’ve been singing for all year be baptized into the Catholic church. I may pick up a chocolate bunny along the way, but it’s all about religion for me and not about kids. It’s about my faith and my ministry.
Easter isn’t half as bad as Mother’s Day, but it has its pitfalls for those who don’t have children and wish they did. You may be attending a family dinner in which everything seems to revolve around other people’s kids. You may meet up with people who keep insisting you need to get pregnant ASAP. You may just feel left out of the conversations. I hope you don’t. I think we all have our roles to play, and there’s no reason you can’t dive into the festivities along with everyone else. Just enjoy the fact that you won’t be bringing home a child who is wired on sugar and whining about not getting as many presents as his cousin. You can relax into your childless life and maybe enjoy a chocolate egg and a glass of cabernet in peace. 
I wish you all a peaceful and blessed Easter. 
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2 thoughts on “Easter doesn’t have to be all about kids

  1. Thanks for the reminder Sue! I like to attend Holy Saturday services. It's a very long worship and is held in the evening. There are almost no young children there and it's a very peaceful mass that helps me to focus on the real spirit of Easter.

    I find this helps to put me in a good state of mind and I'll be joyful at Sunday mass even though I'll be surrounded by the cutest hats, gloves and patent leather shoes around. I will likely feel the happiness of the day. Happy little girls in dresses seem to make everyone around them happy as well. That feeling will carry over into the two family dinners we will attend.

    And of course since I have no example to set I will plan to enjoy as many pieces of candy as I like. Hope you will too!

    Anon S

    Like

  2. Anon S, That sounds like a good Easter plan. After I finish playing piano at the 10:30 Mass on Sunday, I'm going to a fancy restaurant with friends, then will come home and relax with my dog. Happy Easter!

    Like

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